ADA
analog interactive installation / kinetic sculpture / post-digital drawing machine

with
Leonardo Da Vinci: Drawings from the Royal Collection
6 to 23 October, 11am – 3pm daily

and on
Ada Lovelace Day
11 October 2016


at
Nottingham Castle Museum & Art Gallery, UK







ADA is presented alongside Leonardo da Vinci: Drawings from the Royal Collection coinciding with the shows final weekend, the work typifies Leonardo’s inventive approach to the world and to drawing. It also forms part of the Castle’s "Big Draw 2016" programme, this year’s theme brings together Science, Technology, Art, Engineering and Maths. STEAM recalls our Industrial past and the fusion of creative innovation, enterprise and the arts, a theme that couldn’t be more fitting for both ADA and Leonardo.

ADA also celebrates Ada Lovelace Day on 11 October 2016. Lovelace was the sole child of erratic poet Lord Byron, and mathematics-loving Annabella Milbanke. Ada became a mathematician and writer, chiefly known for her work on Charles Babbage’s early mechanical general-purpose computer, The Analytical Engine. Although Babbage and his assistants had sketched out programs for his engine before, Lovelace’s are the most elaborate and complete, and the first to be published (in 1843); hence she is often referred to as “the first computer programmer”.




ADA - Inspired by Ada Lovelace, the world’s first computer programmer, ADA is an artwork with a soul, an automatic drawing machine that visitors are invited to push, pull and prod.  Contained within a temporary room in the Long Gallery, when put into action this large, charcoal studded, helium-filled membrane slowly makes a series of marks, flecks, lines and points that act as a record or memory of its own movements, which are similiar to Leonardo's „lines of force“. > more

Leonardo da Vinci - "My works are the issue of pure and simple experience, who is the one true mistress. Observe the motion of the surface of the water, which resembles that of hair, which has two motions, of which one is caused by the weight of the hair, the other by the direction of the curls; thus the water has eddying motions, one part of which is due to the principal current, the other to the random and reverse motion." These are the Leonardo’s „lines of force“.
Leonardo attempted to record and understand the world around him through drawing. The exhibition shows the incredible range of his interests, from painting and sculpture to engineering, zoology, botany, mapmaking and anatomy. It also demonstrates his mastery of different drawing materials. All but one are private papers, never intended to be seen by anyone else, and many are annotated in his habitual 'mirror writing'. They show Leonardo's remarkable range of interests as an artist and scientist, and capture the essential curiosity of the archetypal 'Renaissance man'.> more

ADA LOVELACE - Ada, Countess of Lovelace (1815 – 1852) was the sole child of the brief and tempestuous marriage of the erratic poet George Gordon, Lord Byron, and his mathematics-loving wife Annabella Milbanke.
Lovelace was an English mathematician and writer, chiefly known for her work on Charles Babbage's early mechanical general-purpose computer, The Analytical Engine. Although Babbage and his assistants had sketched out programs for his engine before, Lovelace’s are the most elaborate and complete, and the first to be published (in 1843); so she is often referred to as “the first computer programmer”. Babbage himself “spoke highly of her mathematical powers, and of her peculiar capability — higher he said than of any one he knew, to prepare the descriptions connected with his calculating machine.” Her notes on the engine include what is recognised as the first algorithm intended to be carried out by a machine.
"Ada Lovelace Day" is an annual event celebrated in mid-October, its goal is to "... raise the profile of women in science, technology, engineering and maths," and to "create new role models for girls and women" in these fields. In 2016 Ada Lovelace day will be celebrated on October 11.
> more

Nottingham Castle Museum & Art Gallery stands on the site of a Castle built by the Normans to establish the rule of law over a famously rebellious city, where the Robin Hood legends began. The present Castle is an elegant 17th century Ducal Palace that was gutted by fire in 1831, by protesters demanding electoral reform, then refashioned and reopened in 1878 as the first municipal art gallery outside London. Nottingham Castle Museum & Art Gallery is the base for the City’s important collections of Fine and Decorative Arts and the first floor gallery spaces host temporary exhibitions of regional, national and international artists.
The majority of the Nottingham City Museums and Galleries’ collection of paintings are housed at the Castle, both on display and in store. In general, between 130 and 200 works are on public display in the architectural splendour of the ‘Long Gallery’. The collection was founded in 1878 and now numbers some 800 oil paintings, over 4000 watercolours, drawings and prints and a small collection of sculpture, including medieval ‘Nottingham’ alabasters. Contemporary art has also been collected from the founding of the museum, across all art forms. > more

Nottingham Castle Museum & Art Gallery
Castle Place | Nottingham | NG1 6EL 
Website: www.nottinghamcastle.org.uk
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